Adapting to a Volatile Terrain

Client: Airstream

Team: Kira Henderson

Date:  Spring 2019

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What if our cities had to adapt to a volatile terrain?

 

In 2050, Antarctica, previously an almost completely uninhabitable location, has become more accessible and a viable option for experimental, nomadic city living. The Antarctic treaty barring commercial industry was dismantled in 2035, allowing a new society to more fully establish itself in this harsh landscape. Much of the ice that covers the continent is flowing towards the sea, cracking under the force of its own weight and melting as earth temperatures rise. These ice shafts can move up to a meter a day and those living on these shafts have had to adapt by being ready to move their physical homes at any time. Some of these homes are motor homes with wheels, others are built on large skis that can be towed across the ice. All of the buildings and street signs connect to the main network system. When an ice movement is sensed, adjustments have to be made—sometimes even entire streets of buildings need to be moved multiple meters to avoid cracks in the ice and maintain the stability of the buildings. To even have an updated map of the city, one has to be continuously connected to the network to navigate their way around as some streets may have moved.

Ice shafts can move up to a meter a day and those living on these shafts have had to adapt by being ready to move their physical homes at any time.

Columbus College of Art & Design | Master of Design 2020